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Couch: Stanford’s Reversal On Cutting 11 Sports Shows What BS It Was In The First Place

The COVID Cover in college sports is officially blown. Clemson, William & Mary, Dartmouth and now even Stanford and so many others are realizing they can’t hide behind the pandemic anymore to explain away their gross mismanagement of billions of dollars of football and basketball revenues. Last summer and fall, colleges across the country were grimly saying the pandemic had catastrophic financial outcomes and that several non-revenue or Olympic sports would have to be cut.  Stanford, the gold standard of Olympic sports, said it had to cut 11 of them after it had done what it could to “exhaust all alternatives before making profound changes in our programs, especially during this difficult time.’’ So sad, so sad. Such BS. And now, just like that, schools that had no choice but to make the cuts suddenly have a choice. They’re announcing that they aren’t going to cut the sports after all. We now have a new trend of not cutting sports that had been cut because of, as Stanford put it last summer, “the harsh new financial realities imposed by COVID-19.’’ On Tuesday, Stanford said all 11 sports would stay.  You might not have noticed. The story came and went in […]

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Written by Greg Couch

Greg earned the 2007 Peter Lisagor Award as the best sports columnist in the Chicagoland area for his work with the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a college football writer in 1997 before becoming a general columnist in 2003. He also won a Lisagor in 2016 for his commentary in RollingStone.com and The Guardian.

Couch penned articles and columns for CNN.com/Bleacher Report, AOL Fanhouse, and The Sporting News and contributed as a writer and on-air analyst for FoxSports.com and Fox Sports 1 TV. In his journalistic roles, Couch has covered the grandest stages of tennis from Wimbledon to the Olympics, among numerous national and international sporting spectacles. He also won first place awards from the U.S. Tennis Writers Association for his event coverage and column writing on the sport in 2010.