Buy The ‘Most Expensive’ Ski Home In The U.S. For $100M — Take A Tour!

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Do you plan on hitting the MegaMillions this week for $1.3 BILLION? Throw down a measly $100 million and buy what’s being called the “Most Expensive” ski slope house in the United States.

Your $100 million will buy an elite Aspen, Colorado alpine private residence where you and your new friends — hitting for over $1.3 BILLION guarantees you’ll have elite new friends who are also wealthy and want to hang out with fellow elite wealthy people — can spread out over 14,000 sq. ft. of living space right on the slopes.

Many of you reading this think you’re already living an elite life. You need to stop and recognize how elite this house is. Take a look at the map. This real estate doesn’t come on the market very often, hence the $100M price tag. LOOK AT THIS LOCATION!

14,000 sq. ft. of living space IN THE ASPEN VILLAGE…ON THE SLOPES. 0.2 miles from the NEAREST STARBUCKS! 0.2 miles from the St. Regis! That’s a private residence!

Look at where that pin is located. Think of all the rich people that will want to be your friend. / Google Maps

From the realtor:

Aspen is arguably the premier ski resort destination in the world. There are only five single-family homes on Aspen Mountain. The most iconic residence with a storied history boasts 14,000 square feet, ten bedrooms, and greater than a football field of true ski-in, ski-out ski access.

There simply is nothing else like it. Just a few hundred yards from The Aspen Mountain Gondola on 1.4 acres on Ajax! Private, wooded, nestled in a grove of Aspen trees. This is Georgica Pond in East Hampton, S. Ocean Blvd. in Palm Beach, or 220 Central Park South.

Held by the same family for decades, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own Aspen’s best address. From the Elevator bridge you enter the grand foyer on the main level. This level also features a gracious office with ensuite bath. The second level has a VIP guest suite. From the Foyer you access the additional three levels on the South wing of the home.

The first level features a media room, living room, kitchen, and dining room with wood burning fireplace and three guest suites. The second level features four gracious guest suites, a ski locker room, billiards area, and fitness center. The third level, or Primary Level features a contemporary grand entertaining with living room, bar, sitting areas, kitchen, formal dining room, primary office, and primary bedroom and bathroom.

Now, could this place go through a $20 million sprucing? Yes. There are several rooms that need gutted like the gym that’s straight out of an early 1990s ski resort. The billiards room is fairly weird with all the black accordion doors, but those are things that elite money can change. You can’t buy a more elite piece of land. The rest can be fixed.

Put it this way, you drop $125 million out the door and you have a place that’s going to attract all the elite Hollywood types who’ll want to see the most expensive private ski lodge in the United States. Just don’t forget to stock the fridge with Busch Light to determine which people you’ll want to hang out with on weekends after the initial house party.

Mortgage: $546,329/mo. if you can get a bank to give you a 30-year loan on this place

via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass
via Zillow / Listed by Steven Shane of Compass

Written by Joe Kinsey

I'm an Ohio guy, born in Dayton, who roots for Ohio State and can handle you guys destroying the Buckeyes, Urban Meyer and everything associated with Columbus.

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