WATCH: Huge Mako Shark Jumps Onto Boat, Nobody Knows What To Do

Video has gone viral of a giant shortfin mako shark jumping out of the water and landing in the bow of a boat, all while tourists were just feet away.

The incident happened over the weekend in New Zealand aboard the Churchys Charters NZ. Captain Ryan Churches was taking a group of people out to catch some kingfish, when suddenly a mako shark grabbed ahold of the line. After a short battle, the shark made its way to the side of the boat before it soared out of the water and landed across the entire front of the boat.

That’s when everyone looked at each other and went, “Uhh… what do we do now?”

WE’RE GONNA NEED A BIGGER BOAT

The mako shark was estimated to be 8-9 feet in size and weighed over 300 pounds.

The incident could have gone a lot worse.

Captain Churches told the New Zealand Herald that less than 30 seconds before the shark came flying onboard, he warned those onboard to move towards the back.

“It just so happened that about 30 seconds later, it jumped on the top of the boat,” the skipper said. “We were all watching the rod and the line was going out to the side of the boat, and it changed direction suddenly. It just happened to jump at the same time and we got a hell of a fright.”

A shortfin mako shark landed aboard a New Zealand fishing boat. (Churchys Charters NZ, via Storyful)

‘WHAT THE F*** DO WE DO NOW?’

Now with another passenger onboard – this time a 9-foot shark with giant teeth, Captain Churches had a big question: What do we do now?

“I was thinking, ‘What the f – – k do we do?’ ” the captain told the Herald. “We can’t go up the front to go near it because they go absolutely bonkers.”

Luckily, with some quick maneuvering involving the boat’s anchor, the shark was eventually able to shuffle himself off.

“We dropped the anchor down a little bit because it seemed to be holding it in place,” said Churches. “He went absolutely bonkers again and pushed himself through the bow rail and slid back into the water.”

The mako is the world’s fastest shark, reaching speeds of up to 46 mph.

It apparently has a track record of finding a new home aboard boats. A few months back, another mako jumped aboard a fishing boat. Fortunately, no one was hurt then either.

Written by Mike Gunzelman

Mike “Gunz” Gunzelman has been involved in the sports and media industry for over a decade. He’s also a risk taker - the first time he ever had sushi was from a Duane Reade in Penn Station in NYC.

Leave a Reply