Oregon-Oregon State Drop ‘Civil War’ From Rivalry

Oregon and Oregon State, referred to as the Civil War for 90 years, have agreed to stop calling the rivalry between the two schools as…the Civil War. The two schools, separated by about 45 miles, agreed to “drop the name as it has a connection to a war fought to preserve slavery,” according to a statement put out by Oregon State president Edward J. Ray.

He added: “Changing this name is overdue.”. “While not intended as reference to the actual Civil War, OSU sports competition should not provide any misconstrued reference to this divisive episode in American history. That we did not act before to change the name was a mistake.”

Now the schools will get down to the business of figuring out what to call the series that has been played 123 times.

Oregon leads the series 78-44–1.

Here’s Oregon State president Edward J. Ray’s full statement:

Members of OSU community,

I am writing to share that Oregon State University and the University of Oregon have agreed that effective immediately the term “Civil War” will no longer be used to promote any athletic competition between the universities.

As you likely know, “Civil War” has been used for football and basketball games — and other sports competition — between OSU and UO since the phrase was first referenced in the 1930’s.

Changing this name is overdue as it represents a connection to a war fought to perpetuate slavery. While not intended as reference to the actual Civil War, OSU sports competition should not provide any misconstrued reference to this divisive episode in American history.

In recent years, some students, faculty, alumni, student-athletes, OSU stakeholders and community members have questioned the appropriateness of this term. That we did not act before to change the name was a mistake. We do so now, along with other important actions to advance equal opportunity and justice for all and in recognition that Black Lives Matter.

President-elect King Alexander and I are in full agreement with this decision. So is UO President Mike Schill, OSU Vice President and Director of Athletics Scott Barnes, and UO Athletics Director Rob Mullens, as well as numerous current and past student-athletes from both universities.

In the months ahead, OSU and the University of Oregon will engage collaboratively to involve their respective students, faculty, staff, student-athletes, alumni, donors, community partners and athletics sponsors to consider other, more appropriate names, if any, to call the athletics rivalry between our two great universities.

I encourage your support and engagement in this naming transition, as we work to identify other areas where our references, practices and norms do not represent our values of diversity and inclusivity.

Sincerely,

Edward J. Ray

President

Written by Joe Kinsey

I'm an Ohio guy, born in Dayton, who roots for Ohio State and can handle you guys destroying the Buckeyes, Urban Meyer and everything associated with Columbus.

3 Comments

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  1. “The two schools, separated by about 45 miles, agreed to ‘drop the name as it has a connection to a war fought to preserve slavery,’ according to a statement put out by Oregon State president Edward J. Ray.”
    The name also has a connection to a war fought to END slavery. Unbelievably, the war had the SAME NAME! I’m no genius, but most wars I’ve heard of typically have 2 sides. I never thought people would dig this deep to be offended.

  2. The Civil War is one of the if not the most important war behind the Revolutionary War in America. We preserved the Union for goodness sakes! If one believes the Civil War was fought to end slavery, well isn’t that a reason to celebrate. The United States of America was preserved, the Confederacy ended. The nation abolished slavery during the Civil War. Woke culture is a joke!

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