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Johns Hopkins Publishes Study Saying COVID-19 Deaths Overblown, Then Deletes It

Johns Hopkins University published a study that COVID-19 isn’t nearly as bad as it seems.

Then deleted it.

This strange decision was reported by NotTheBee.com, which used Internet archive Wayback Machine to reveal the Johns Hopkins’ study in its entirety. The study was released Sunday.

You can check a sample of it in the chart below. Or just read the whole thing here.

Per NotTheBee.com:

Genevieve Briand, assistant program director of the Applied Economics master’s degree program at Hopkins, critically analyzed the effect of COVID-19 on U.S. deaths using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in her webinar titled “COVID-19 Deaths: A Look at U.S. Data.”

Brand stated what many to believe is the obvious regarding the older population dying from COVID-related causes considerably more than the younger generation.

“The reason we have a higher number of reported COVID-19 deaths among older individuals than younger individuals is simply because every day in the U.S. older individuals die in higher numbers than younger individuals,” Briand wrote.

She gave multiple more examples of how COVID deaths among the elderly aren’t any different than elderly deaths in recent years from any other cause.

Then Briand dropped the following bombshell.

“The reason we have a higher number of reported COVID-19 deaths among older individuals than younger individuals is simply because every day in the U.S. older individuals die in higher numbers than younger individuals,” Briand said.

Why Johns Hopkins decided to delete this information is anyone’s guess. And knowing how all of this has been reported on since it made its way to the U.S. last winter, nobody will likely ask, either.

It may or may not be accurate, but it sure seems like way too many people would rather keep a bad thing going than get to the bottom of how COVID is truly impacting America.

With that in mind, the idea that Johns Hopkins may have been pressured into deleting its findings may not be so far-fetched.

Written by Sam Amico

Sam Amico spent 15 years covering the NBA for Sports Illustrated, FOX Sports and NBA.com, along with a few other spots, and currently runs his own basketball website on the side, FortyEightMinutes.com.

8 Comments

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  1. When people go out of their way to this degree to hide the facts, there is something extremely wrong. People need to wake the fuck up and fight for their constitutional freedoms. Governments are shutting down small businesses while there has not been a single government worker laid off. It’s not that hard to figure out what’s going on.

  2. Covid 19 is real and precautions should be taken to protect the most vulnerable. With that being said, I envision that in about a year or so, the we will see a story from the fear mongering so called mainstream media walking back the numbers of deaths and cases. The unstated reason will be is that it will be politically safe to do so. We will find that after a more in depth review that positive tests were over counted based on flawed methodology. The death count will also be impacted by this same thinking. The story will probably land on a Saturday or Sunday.

    If I am wrong, so be it. It probably means I m qualified for a management position at the CDC.

    • Where you are wrong is how this will be walked back. What will happen, if Trump loses in court and Biden fully steals the election is, Biden will order a 6 week lockdown, during which time PCR tests will be ratcheted back to normal levels (not the overblown levels they are being run at now), and deaths will begin to be reported as normal – that is, a heart attack with COVID present will be listed as a heart attack, and not a COVID death.

      Poof! No more virus!

  3. I expected Clay to do a piece on this by now…hopefully, he will. In the Editor’s Note, JHU did a hit job on the study by Genevieve Briand. Maybe Clay can use his reach to try to schedule an interview with her? Allow her to defend her study (or not)? Or, maybe ask JHU or the AMA if heart disease, cancer, etc. deaths are down this year? If so, why?

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