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Even In Moments Of Crisis, No One Wants To Buy Anthony Davis’ Chips

Videos by OutKick

If this is what NBA critics mean by refusing to financially support China-backed basketball players, the movement is strong.

However, the protest in purchasing may have been too harsh on Lakers forward Anthony Davis, whose featured Ruffles flavor — Lime & Jalapeño — were seen nearly untouched as grocery shoppers frantically hit New Orleans shelves to stock up for Hurricane Ida.

Twitter user Christian Voelkel released the video, whose caption read: no one wants this a**holes ruffles. Also spotted in the video is a discount/bargain sticker beneath the bags, implying that the crisps have long been in low demand.

After Davis played with the New Orleans Hornets/Pelicans for seven seasons, his open interest in the Lakers set the wheels in motion for a blockbuster trade.

New Orleans fans grew resentful of their former No. 1 overall pick’s decision and have long held a grudge against AD — which only worsen with Davis’ championship win in 2020. Like Pepperidge Farms, the fan base never forgot.

Like a trip down memory aisle, Louisiana stores were stripped nearly bare by the panicked customers anticipating Ida, recalling the empty shelves across America in March 2020. Impervious to natural disasters, the Anthony Davis-branded Ruffles chips now joins Dasani’s ranks of most undesired grocery products.

A Twitter user’s response to the video featured another item worth joining the Menu of Misfit Products: smooth penne.

Follow along on Twitter: @AlejandroAveela

Written by Alejandro Avila

Alejandro Avila lives in Southern California and previously covered news for the LA Football Network. Guided by Kevin Harlan on one shoulder, Eli Manning on the other, Alejandro joins the OutKick community with an authentic passion for sports, pop culture, America, and episodes of Jeopardy!

 

Twitter: @AlejandroAveela

2 Comments

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  1. I think today’s NBA players, in general, are the least relatable pro athletes to everyday people who buy products anyway. They’re horrible spokesmen. This generation of players just aren’t good marketing personalities, unlike the prior generation. Think about it. Notice a ton of current NBA players doing spots for products? I think it’s because marketing people realize these guys have little in common with most people, are quite aloof, not very friendly, aren’t tremendously respectful of others, and most are, quite frankly, painfully boring personalities. It’s not just AD.

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