Ed Reed Says He Turned Down Jackson State Job To Take Bethune-Cookman Position, Calls Out Athletic Director In Emotional Interview

Videos by OutKick

The ongoing situation regarding Ed Reed and Bethune-Cookman took another turn on Tuesday night. During an interview with Roland Martin, Reed said he turned down the Jackson State job after Deion Sanders left, to take the job at Bethune-Cookman.

The interview with Ed Reed took place after Roland Martin said on social media that Ed Reed was watching an interview with the Bethune-Cookman President. At this point, Reed texted Martin and came on the show to tell his side of story.

During a portion of the interview, Roland Martin asked if other HBCU’s had reached out to Ed Reed about possible coaching opportunities. Reed went on to say that Deion Sanders had called him about the Jackson State opening.

“I turned down the Jackson State job to come here Roland Martin. Jackson State, Deion Sanders called me himself man.”

Regarding the footage of Reed seeming to bash the school while he was picking up trash on the campus, Reed made it a point to say he was not trying to belittle the school during an Instagram video.

ed-reed-bethune-cookman-player-petition
Ed Reed says that he turned down the Jackson State job for Bethune-Cookman

No Love-Lost Between Ed Reed And AD Reggie Theus

In regards to the relationship with Athletic Director and head basketball coach Reggie Theus, Ed Reed was clearly upset at the perceived lack of respect from the coach. It was at this point in the interview that Reed said that Theus was ‘Evil’

“I took families to a basketball game, and this man Reggie Theus is evil man, you’re evil man. This man is evil, dude. I took parents to a basketball game, you understand me, and he don’t come out during the warmups, at all. The parents are like ‘where’s the coach?’ and when you do come out you got another man fixing your pants.

“Roland, I’m not what these people are portraying me to be,” Reed explained. “And the people that know me, know I’m not like that.”

Eight Enrollees In A Bad Spot, Reed Still Wants To Stay

Due to athletes signing letters of intent or financial aid agreements, the players that have already started classes would have to jump through hurdles to find another place to play. After signing with a school, the student-athletes could have a hard time finding a new school. According to Ed Reed, there are eight players who are currently in this situation.

“I’ve got eight kids who committed the week before. These kids calling me, parents calling me asking ‘what we gonna do?’. I can’t get these kids into no school. I can’t have these kids uncommitted go somewhere else, and you’re telling me I’m withdrawing, no I am not withdrawing. I still wanna coach here and coach these kids, after all this that’s going on.”

An ‘Olive-Branch’ Extended To Bethune-Cookman From Reed

During the interview, a member of Ed Reed’s team, Roy Parrish, mentioned that they have tried to extend an olive-branch to the school, in hopes of finding a solution. Now, this seems like a very long shot, but Parrish is hoping to sit down with the school and hash this out.

“We’ve extended an olive-branch to the administration, to come back and give us the opportunity. We know that he’s (Reed) passionate, he put the passion before the purpose.

“We all want the same thing, but it starts with the conversation,” Parrish added. “We requested that, so far we haven’t been granted that access. We’re still waiting to see if that’s possible.”

The likelihood of the school wanting to discuss the potential of Reed actually signing a contract with Bethune-Cookman sounds pretty slim at this point. After speaking with multiple people involved in the situation over the weekend, it feels as if this ship has sailed.

On Monday, students marched throughout campus to protest the current living conditions at the school, along with the situation regarding Ed Reed.

The situation between both parties is currently in a pretty rough spot, but lets hope that the school can figure out the right solution for the student-athletes.

Written by Trey Wallace

Wallace started covering the SEC in 2012, as the conference landscape was beginning to change. Prior to his time in Knoxville, Wallace worked in Nashville for The Read Optional, where he first produced content that garnered national attention. His passion for sports is evident in his work and has led him to break some of college football’s biggest stories. His social media reach and natural podcast proficiency continue to make Wallace one of SEC’s most trusted sources.

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply