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Despite Nosedive, Georgetown Keeping Patrick Ewing For Another Year

You don’t need to have riveting success to have some job security. At least, not if your name is Patrick Ewing and your employer is the Georgetown basketball program.

Ewing, of course, is the legendary Georgetown player and current head coach of the program. The Hoyas, of course, are having one of their worst seasons in history.

But the athletic department has made it clear that Ewing will be back next season.

“As a university with high standards and expectations for both academic and athletic excellence, we all share the disappointment of a difficult season,” Georgetown athletics director Lee Reed said in the statement. “In this ever evolving landscape of college athletics we are committed to Coach Ewing, and we are working with him to evaluate every aspect of the men’s basketball program to make the necessary changes for him to put us back on the path to success for next year.”

That’s about the only good news Ewing has had lately. After all, the Hoyas are a miserable 6-22 on the season (entering Wednesday night). They are 0-17 in the Big East and have lost 18 in a row.

That, folks, is what’s known as a college basketball dumpster fire. When Ewing played, Georgetown was an intimidating force that gave prospective opponents “Hoya Paranoia.”

But with Ewing as coach, opponents now circle games against Georgetown on their calendar for an entirely different reason. In five seasons at Georgetown, Ewing has compiled a 68-81 record overall.

“The former Knicks star was on top of the world last year when he coached the Hoyas to a Big East championship and the team’s first NCAA tournament appearance since 2015, but it’s been a long fall from grace,” wrote Joseph Salvador of SI.com

Written by Sam Amico

Sam Amico is the assistant managing editor-newsdesk at OutKick. He is also the co-founder and senior writer at Hoopswire.com, and has covered the NBA for nearly 20 years, including his time at Sports Illustrated, FOX Sports and CBS Sports. A native of Akron, Ohio, his writing career began in Wyoming.

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