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CDC Changes Asymptomatic Testing Recommendations

The CDC has changed its recommendations as to testing asymptomatic people for COVID-19. The following is the new guidance from the CDC:

  • If you have been in close contact (within 6 feet) of a person with a COVID-19 infection for at least 15 minutes but do not have symptoms:
    • You do not necessarily need a test unless you are a vulnerable individual or your health care provider or State or local public health officials recommend you take one.
      • A negative test does not mean you will not develop an infection from the close contact or contract an infection at a later time.
    • You should monitor yourself for symptoms. If you develop symptoms, you should evaluate yourself under the considerations set forth above.
    • You should strictly adhere to CDC mitigation protocols, especially if you are interacting with a vulnerable individual. You should adhere to CDC guidelines to protect vulnerable individuals with whom you live.
  • If you do not have COVID-19 symptoms and have not been in close contact with someone known to have a COVID-19 infection:
    • You do not need a test.
      • A negative test does not mean you will not contract an infection at a later time.
    • If you decide to be tested, you should self-isolate at home until your test results are known, and then adhere to your health care provider’s advice. This does not apply to routine screening or surveillance testing at work, school, or similar situations.

“This means you don’t need to run and get tested unless you have symptoms,” Outkick’s Dr. David Chao said today. “The CDC continues to change. It’s not just sports leagues that change rules.”

The CDC also recently changed its 14-day travel quarantine recommendation that now “advises that following a trip of any kind, travelers should just follow many of the same precautions they apply during their day-to-day lives to prevent the spread of COVID-19,” according to Afar.com.

Written by Joe Kinsey

I'm an Ohio guy, born in Dayton, who roots for Ohio State and can handle you guys destroying the Buckeyes, Urban Meyer and everything associated with Columbus.

4 Comments

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  1. The only testing should be done for sick people in a medical setting. All public testing does is pump out data for fear porn.

    Problem is, politicians are committed to “positivity” as a metric for “community spread”, so unless you can convince these politicians to quit playing that game, testing only sick people is going to give those politicians more ammunition to say that “positivity is high and spread is OUT OF CONTROL!”

    The only testing that should be done to determine “spread” is of randomized samples. Everything else is shenanigans.

    • Agreed. Randomized samples is the way to go. When you test only people that are banging down your door because they were in contact with a Covid case or have flu-like symptoms, it skews your data and no longer reflects what is actually happening.

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