in

Big Ten Can’t Hide Their Vote Forever

As Joe detailed on Thursday, eight Nebraska football players are suing the Big Ten, stating that the cancellation of football season this Fall should be “overturned because it didn’t follow established procedures in the decision-making process and was ‘unjustified’ based on flawed and misapplied medical information.”

The Big Ten’s response is kind of funny:

Yes, the harm would be “incredible” if we learned how Big Ten universities and chancellors, who are paid high six to low seven figures in taxpayer money totaling over $13 million annually in the conference, voted on behalf of their public universities. Imagine the horror at the transparency.

Here is another of the Big Ten’s arguments, followed by a response from the players’ attorney:

 

The judge in the case has given the Big Ten a deadline of Monday at 5:00 pm to come up with a formal response.

Meanwhile, on a separate front, the attorney Tom Mars, who has worked as an investigator for the NCAA and has been in the news for his work representing Justin Fields and Cade Mays in their transfer cases, is FOIA’ing the 13 Big Ten schools to figure out how they voted:

Maybe the Big Ten can filibuster the release of this information for a little while through the courts, but they’re not going to be able to hide forever. There’s clearly a reason why they don’t want this information out there — maybe, despite commissioner Kevin Warren’s repeated claims, there never actually was a formal vote. Or, maybe the presidents and chancellors who did vote for cancellation don’t want their names on it because it’s unpopular in regions where they are purported public servants. Whatever the case may be, there’ll be a day where the chickens have to come home to roost.

 

Written by Ryan Glasspiegel

Ryan Glasspiegel grew up in Connecticut, graduated from University of Wisconsin-Madison, and lives in Chicago. Before OutKick, he wrote for Sports Illustrated and The Big Lead. He enjoys expensive bourbon and cheap beer.

2 Comments

Leave a Reply
  1. Great work Ryan.

    The problem with the lawsuit is that it mixes ‘business’ with amateur athleticism and it’s late. 95% of division 1 athletes don’t go on to make money from being an athlete. Some make money as a star college alumni, but the lawsuit mixes apples and oranges in a strange way.

    In addition, the suit may serve a purpose of eventual transparency, but not getting the league going again. The big 10 has enough endowments to survive without sports revenue and without sports.

Leave a Reply

Login to comment on this post. Not a VIP? Signup Here