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TSU Player That Survived Life-Threatening Injury Offered Coaching Internship From Tennessee Titans

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Former Tennessee State University linebacker Christion Abercrombie received an offer from the Tennessee Titans to join the coaching staff as an intern.

Abercrombie’s path to the NFL was anything but ordinary, sustaining a head injury back in 2018 during a game against Vanderbilt that nearly cost the student-athlete his life.

Abercrombie spent 18 days at Vanderbilt University Medical Center after arriving in critical condition, requiring two brain surgeries to tend to the head trauma. For nearly seven months, Abercrombie faced the uphill obstacles of rehabbing and overcame all odds to land a role that will value his determination and love for football.

According to USA Today, “Abercrombie will serve as a strength and conditioning intern for the team during camp.”

Finishing his time at TSU after graduating in May, Abercrombie declared he would continue to pursue a job in sports, even if his days wearing football pads were behind him.

TSU’s Dean of Students Frank Stevenson gave a special graduation ceremony message devoted to Abercrombie for resiliently crossing the finish line. “Christion was … not expected to live. Today, he is graduating, and God is good. We celebrate his life.”

Abercrombie’s gratitude in every step of his journey continues to keep possibilities endless for the promising 23-year-old intern. “I feel very happy and blessed to be graduating with my undergraduate degree from TSU,” commented Abercrombie. “I thank my parents, and everybody for their prayers and support.”

Written by Alejandro Avila

Alejandro Avila lives in Southern California and previously covered news for the LA Football Network. Guided by Kevin Harlan on one shoulder, Eli Manning on the other, Alejandro joins the OutKick community with an authentic passion for sports, pop culture, America, and episodes of Jeopardy!

 

Twitter: @AlejandroAveela

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