‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ Narrator John Larroquette Reveals He Was Paid In Weed

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The narrator of the original “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” made some serious green for his services. But not the money kind.

Actor John Larroquette revealed Thursday that he made a deal with the director of the 1974 slasher film: He’d narrate the prologue in exchange for some weed.

“Totally true,” Larroquette said. “He gave me some marijuana or a matchbox or whatever you called it in those days. I walked out of the studio and patted him on the back side and said, ‘Good luck to you!'”

'Texas Chainsaw Massacre' Narrator John Larroquette Reveals He Was Paid In Weed
John Larroquette gained fame on the NBC Series “Night Court.” (Photo by JC Olivera/Getty Images)

Larroquette, now a five-time Emmy Award winner, says he met director Tobe Hooper in 1969. The two struck up a friendship while Larroquette was working as a bartender in a Colorado resort.

A few years later, Hooper called him up and asked for an hour of his time to “narrate something” for his movie.

“I said ‘Fine!’ It was a favor,” Larroquette said.

That original “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” had just a $100,000 budget but made $30 million at the box office. The classic horror film spawned numerous sequels, remakes and even video games.

John Larroquette gained fame on”Night Court.”

Although he made his career playing attorney Dan Fielding on the popular NBC sitcom, the now 75-year-old actor became a staple in the Leatherface saga. He went on to narrate several of the “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” installments, including the most recent sequel in 2022.

And, yes, he did eventually get paid actual money.

“You do something for free in the 1970s and get a little money in the ’90s,” he said. “It’s certainly the one credit that’s stuck strongly to my resume.”

Believe it or not, though, Larroquette has never actually seen any of the films.

“I’m not a big horror movie fan,” he said.

Written by Amber Harding

Amber is a Midwestern transplant living in Murfreesboro, TN. She spends most of her time taking pictures of her dog, explaining why real-life situations are exactly like "this one time on South Park," and being disappointed by the Tennessee Volunteers.

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