National Title Game Ticket Prices Are Surprisingly Low

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Tickets to the Georgia/TCU national title game aren’t as expensive as you might think.

Generally speaking, tickets to the football national title game or the Final Four are known to be incredibly expensive. It costs a solid amount of money to get through the door.

However, that’s not really the case ahead of the Monday championship matchup between Georgia and TCU.

Georgia/TCU tickets aren’t incredibly expensive. (Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/Getty Images)

As of Saturday morning, there are tickets on SeatGeek for the game at SoFi Stadium for well under $500 with fees included.

TicketIQ estimates the average ticket prices on the secondary market are down 36% from last seasons’ title matchup between Georgia and Alabama, according to the Athens Banner-Herald.

While $500 is still a lot of money, especially if you’re buying for the whole family, it’s not absolutely terrible. It’s certainly doable for a lot of people.

Why are tickets for TCU/Georgia not more expensive?

Honestly, it’s very surprising ticket prices are down from last year’s title game. It’s very surprising, especially when you look at the factors.

First, it’s TCU’s first ever trip to the College Football Playoff championship game. The Horned Frogs have been on an incredible run this season, and it could end in Hollywood fashion Monday night at SoFi Stadium. Seeing as how the program has never been here before, you’d think the demand would drive the market up.

Apparently, that’s not the case as of Saturday.

Some TCU/Georgia tickets are selling for less than $500. (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)

Secondly, and this is more important, TCU is backed by an insane amount of wealth and oil money. When you think about money in the state of Texas, there’s only two schools that come to mind: TCU and SMU.

Yes, UT has a lot of money, but it’s a very large public school. It’s a bit different. TCU and SMU are private universities backed by lots of private funds that stem from deep oil pockets. The median family income in 2017 was nearly $190,000, according to the New York Times. For comparison, the median family income for a UGA student doesn’t even crack $130,000.

The boosters and average graduates have the resources to buy tickets no matter the price. It turns out they just won’t have to.

TCU/Georgia tickets are surprisingly cheap. (Photo by Alika Jenner/Getty Images)

Could things change the closer we get to kickoff? Perhaps, but for now, tickets appear to be a bargain.

Written by David Hookstead

David is a college football fanatic who foolishly convinces himself every season the Wisconsin Badgers will finally win a national title. Has been pretending to be a cowboy ever since the first episode of Yellowstone aired.

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