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NCAA Tournament: A Look At March Madness Venues And Allowed Attendance

Yes, there will be fans inside the gyms at the NCAA Tournament this season. No, there won’t be nearly as many as there are in normal years.

But something is better than nothing, especially after last year, when the Tournament was called off.

This year, the entire tourney will take place in Indiana, with the Final Four slated for Indianapolis. Six different venues will be used, and each will allow players, coaches, essential staff, family members of participating teams and a number of fans.

“We continue to use the knowledge we have gained over the season on how to conduct games in a safe environment,” NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement. “I want to thank our host universities and conferences, the Indiana State Health Department, and the leaders in the Marion, Monroe and Tippecanoe county health departments as they help make that possible.”

Hence, the reason the NCAA decided to hold the whole tourney in one state — reducing travel and ideally, decreasing the odds of positive COVID tests.

Below is a list of where games will be played and number of fans allowed at each venue.

FIRST FOUR

  1. Mackey Arena, Purdue University, West Lafayette: 3,560 fans.
  2. Assembly Hall, Indiana University, Bloomington: 4,306 fans.

ROUNDS 1-2

  1. Mackey Arena (see above)
  2. Assembly Hall (see above)
  3. Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis: 5,000 fans.
  4. Hinkle Fieldhouse, Butler University, Indianapolis: 2,275 fans.
  5. Indiana Farmers Coliseum, Indianapolis: 1,700 fans.
  6. Lucas Oil Stadium: Indianpolis: 7,500 fans.

SWEET SIXTEEN

  1. Bankers Life Fieldhouse (see above)
  2. Hinkle Fieldhouse (see above)

ELITE EIGHT, FINAL FOUR, CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

  1. Lucas Oil Stadium: 17,500 fans

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Written by Sam Amico

Sam Amico is the assistant managing editor-newsdesk at OutKick. He is also the co-founder and senior writer at Hoopswire.com, and has covered the NBA for nearly 20 years, including his time at Sports Illustrated, FOX Sports and CBS Sports. A native of Akron, Ohio, his writing career began in Wyoming.

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