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HOF’er Roberto Alomar Fired By MLB Over Sexual Misconduct

Longtime MLB infielder Roberto Alomar has been fired by Major League Baseball, and placed on the league’s ineligible list after an investigation into a 2014 sexual misconduct allegation.

Rob Manfred, MLB commissioner, released a statement Friday announcing the decision.

“We are grateful for the courage of the individual who came forward. MLB will continue to strive to create environments in which people feel comfortable speaking up without fear of recrimination, retaliation, or exclusion,” Manfred stated.

Alomar also lost his position fired from his role as special assistant with the Blue Jays.

MLB said it would cut all ties with Alomar. A banner honoring Alomar, whose No. 12 was retired by the team, will be removed from Toronto’s Rogers Centre.

“Having reviewed all of the available evidence from the now completed investigation, I have concluded that Mr. Alomar violated MLB’s policies, and that termination of his consultant contract and placement on MLB’s Ineligible List are warranted,” Manfred said.

“At my office’s request, an independent investigation was conducted by an external legal firm to review an allegation of sexual misconduct reported by a baseball industry employee earlier this year involving Mr. Alomar in 2014,” a statement released by Manfred read.

“Having reviewed all of the available evidence from the now completed investigation, I have concluded that Mr. Alomar violated MLB’s policies, and that termination of his consultant contract and placement on the MLB’s Ineligible List are warranted.”

Written by Matt Loede

Matt has been a part of the Cleveland Sports landscape working in the media since 1994 when he graduated from broadcasting school. His coverage beats include the Cleveland Indians, Cleveland Browns and Cleveland Cavaliers. He's written three books, and won the "2020 AP Sports Stringer Lifetime Service Award."

8 Comments

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  1. WHAT evidence would anyone have 7 years after the alleged act? And if the person did have evidence, should not there be a “statute of limitations” for laying accusations? How does Alomar prove something did or did not happen seven years ago?

  2. The investigative arm of MLB has been on top of these things and completed investigations in a timely manner. This one only took 7 years.

    Mr. Alomar has a history of this but MLB STILL signed him to a contract AFTER his initial incident.

  3. This isn’t the first time Alomar has been involved in scandals with women. He’s had multiple incidents over the years. Here’s what concerns me. Rich, famous, HoFers like Alomar are protected by “handlers” all around them. If you’re still getting into public scandals with people protecting you, you must be a real piece of work. Makes me wonder how many other incidents happened over the years we never heard about.

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