Curt Schilling On Why Pitchers Should Work Quickly

San Diego Padres pitcher Mike Clevinger threw six shutout innings last week in San Diego’s 4-0 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks before calling out Diamondbacks broadcaster Bob Brenly for comments made during his start.

“I overheard a little talking upstairs with Bob [Brenly] saying that he might have a flight delayed because of my pitching,” Clevinger told Bally Sports San Diego after the game. “So I thought, ‘Let’s see if I can work fast and attack.’ And it seemed to go really, really well. So, thanks, Bob.”

PADRES’ MIKE CLEVINGER CALLS OUT DIAMONDBACKS ANNOUNCER BOB BRENLY AFTER SCORELESS OUTING

Former MLB right-handed pitcher Curt Schilling had some thoughts he shared exclusively with OutKick on the whole situation between the ace and the broadcaster.

“First of all, listen, to each his own from a mechanic’s perspective,” Schilling said. “But that’s kind of goofy looking, which is neither here nor there. But I will tell you this. If the pitch clock comes into play when you’re on the mound, you’re not a good pitcher.”

Schilling continued: “You can have good games. You can do well in certain periods of time. But the only people more unhappy about your timing, your mechanics at the time between pitches than the fans, is your teammates. So there used to be a saying, work fast, throw strikes, change speeds, work fast. Go back and look. Maddux, Clemens, Pedro, and look at any consistently good-to-great pitcher in the history of the game they didn’t take long because you got your team on and off the field as quickly as possible and your teammates appreciate it.”

Schilling also had some advice to give Clevinger:

“I guarantee you, look at the metrics behind a pitcher that works fast. Defensive metrics. And I bet you they’re better for the guy that works fast than the guy that works slow,” he said. “So, Mike, I get it. But I can promise you this consistent greatness is going to elude you if you continue to take Broadway plays worth the time between pitches.”

Written by Curt Schilling

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