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Census: Which States Grew the Most From 2010-2020

The U.S. Census Bureau announced Monday that the United States population was 331,449,281 as of April 1, 2020. That figure includes all 50 states and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico and represents a population increase of 22,703,743 (up 7.4%) from 308,745,538 in 2010.

The most populous state was California with 39,538,223 residents, while Wyoming was the least populous at 576,851. Texas gained the most residents with just under 4,000,000 added to its population, bringing the state’s overall population to 29,145,505. Utah has the fastest growing population (18.4%), while Puerto Rico has seen the greatest population decline.

The explosive growth in Texas will mean two more seats in the House of Representatives. Five states — Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina Oregon — will gain one seat in the House. California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia will each lose one seat.

The numbers show what many of us already suspected: The South and West continue to gain steam while the Northeast and Midwest continue to lose citizens to states with warmth and job growth.

As for the population as a whole, the New York Times points out that “there are now more Americans 80 and older than 2 or younger — means the United States may be entering an era of substantially lower population growth.”

A declining birth rate isn’t a new trend. In 2019, the rate fell to its lowest level in 35 years and below the standard of 2.1 babies per woman to maintain the U.S. population through birth alone, according to CNBC. Officials hoping for a COVID baby boom are in for a disappointment. The Brookings Institute reported in late December that 2021 births are expected to be off by 300,000 to 500,000.

Percentage change in resident population for the 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico from 2010-2020:

  1. Utah 18.4%
  2. Idaho 17.3%
  3. Texas 15.9%
  4. North Dakota 15.8%
  5. Nevada 15%
  6. Colorado 14.8%
  7. Florida 14.6%
  8. Washington 14.6%
  9. D.C. 14.6%
  10. Arizona 11.9%
  11. South Carolina 10.7%
  12. Georgia 10.6%
  13. Oregon 10.6%
  14. Delaware 10.2%
  15. Montana 9.6%
  16. North Carolina 9.5%
  17. South Dakota 8.9%
  18. Tennessee 8.9%
  19. Virginia 7.9%
  20. Minnesota 7.6%
  21. Nebraska 7.4%
  22. Massachusetts 7.4%
  23. Maryland 7%
  24. Hawaii 7%
  25. California 6.1%
  26. New Jersey 5.7%
  27. Oklahoma 5.5%
  28. Alabama 5.1%
  29. Indiana 4.7%
  30. Iowa 4.7%
  31. New Hampshire 4.6%
  32. Rhode Island 4.3%
  33. New York 4.2%
  34. Kentucky 3.8%
  35. Wisconsin 3.6%
  36. Arkansas 3.3%
  37. Alaska 3.3%
  38. Kansas 3%
  39. Vermont 2.8%
  40. New Mexico 2.8%
  41. Missouri 2.8%
  42. Louisiana 2.7%
  43. Maine 2.6%
  44. Pennsylvania 2.4%
  45. Wyoming 2.3%
  46. Ohio 2.3%
  47. Michigan 2%
  48. Connecticut 0.9%
  49. Illinois -0.1%
  50. Mississippi -0.2%
  51. West Virginia -3.2%
  52. Puerto Rico -11.8%

Written by Joe Kinsey

I'm an Ohio guy, born in Dayton, who roots for Ohio State and can handle you guys destroying the Buckeyes, Urban Meyer and everything associated with Columbus.

3 Comments

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  1. “there are now more Americans 80 and older than 2 or younger — means the United States may be entering an era of substantially lower population growth.”

    Baby boomers and their 1960s culture of drugs and free love are heading for death.

    Still the fact nobody is reproducing is a bad thing…hence why immigration has been pumped up.

  2. The best thing I’ve heard come out of all this is that conservatives are continuing or even exceeding previous birth rates while liberals are having children at by far an all time low. Gives a little hope for the future if we all raise our children to be open-minded, thoughtful, rational people (ie not today’s liberals).

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