Beirut After The Blast: The Destruction Is Catastrophic

The Beirut blast attributed to detonation at an ammonium nitrate facility is now being blamed for 100 deaths and at least 4,000 wounded. The images out of the Beirut port show total annihilation after 2,700 tons of the ammonium nitrate ignited. Government officials say it had been stored at the facility since being confiscated from a cargo ship in 2014.

Drone footage shot Wednesday by The Associated Press showed that the blast tore open a cluster of towering grain silos, dumping their contents into the debris and earth thrown up by the blast. Some 80% of Lebanon’s wheat supply is imported, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department.

Estimates suggest some 85% of the country’s grain was stored at the now-destroyed silos.

It’s being reported that upwards of 300,000 people have been left homeless from the destruction in the blast’s way. One official says the destruction resembles Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the atomic bombs were dropped on those cities during World War II.

The blast is said to have rattled windows in Cyprus, which is 100 miles away.

(Photo by Daniel Carde/Getty Images)
(Photo by Marwan Tahtah/Getty Images)
(Photo by Daniel Carde/Getty Images)
(Photo by Daniel Carde/Getty Images)
(Photo by Marwan Tahtah/Getty Images)
(Photo by Daniel Carde/Getty Images)

Written by Joe Kinsey

I'm an Ohio guy, born in Dayton, who roots for Ohio State and can handle you guys destroying the Buckeyes, Urban Meyer and everything associated with Columbus.

3 Comments

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  1. From the looks of the massive crater left behind that’s filled with water, it appears the explosion could have come from below ground-level. It looked like a much larger version of the explosion you see with a bunker buster bomb. Tragic, and highly suspicious.

  2. I saw an angle of the blast that shows things just being straight up vaporized in the vicinity of the blast. Veterans of various wars that live there say it’s the biggest explosion they’ve ever seen. You don’t have to be an expert in explosions to see how massive it was.

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